On March 21, 1865 — three weeks before the official end of the American Civil War — the Board of Regents for the State of Kansas met for the first time to discuss the state’s new flagship institution of higher education: the University of Kansas.

For the next 150 years, the university educated leaders, built healthy communities, and made discoveries that changed the world. A Jayhawk named Barnum Brown discovered Tyrannosaurus rex in 1902. Another, Vernon Smith, received the Nobel Prize for economics 100 years later. The inventor of basketball taught at KU; so did the inventor of the time-release capsules used in contemporary pharmaceuticals. But these achievements represent just a piece of the history behind Kansas’ storied university.

Thousands of leaders — including astronauts, artists, authors, senators, governors, teachers, nurses, physicians, pharmacists, musicians, architects, engineers, and lawyers — have mastered their disciplines on the Hill. Today almost 28,000 students come to KU each fall from every U.S. state and over 100 countries.​

As we prepare to celebrate the sesquicentennial in 2015, please share your ideas, inspiration, and vision for KU's next 150 years.

Please visit the Kenneth Spencer Research Library online KU150 celebration.    

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One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times